Jenny LynnMy life has been a series of adventures, both positive and negative, but all of them highly instructional.  The universe knew I had alot to learn when I arrived in this world!  I’ve had near miss adventures with death, and many mini deaths of the spirit as I’ve painfully outgrown many of the situations I once believed were real.  When everyone else was panicking that I’d lost my way with schizophrenia in my early twenties, I came back from the edge.  When at the end of one of my identities in my late twenties, I worried what I could do with my life, I became a teacher in secondary and tertiary education. When I wondered how I could look after my baby daughter alone with next to no money, I came through it somehow.  When I spent 6 years in court with my belligerent ex husband cursing his existence, I realised eventually that was another identity I’d outgrown.  Step families, death and illness later and I’m still here and alive and well.  People often are amazed when I share with them what I’ve been through.  And I don’t need any badges.  I’m at peace with it all.  It’s just the stuff of life.  We all have it. Our mission I believe profoundly is to GET OVER IT and stop letting it define who  you are.

I suppose after 30 years of Buddhist practice which has navigated me through a whole roller coaster of life events, I’ve come out of it with a very simple outlook in life.  Be authentic.  Live in the here and now.  Tell your truth, kindly, reverently and honestly.  If you don’t tell your truth, then not only are you just pretending, but the chances are, someone else will tell it for you.  And it is this passion for those of us in the healing industry to become ‘real’ people that I bring to my training and mentorship programme.

I have mentored professional helpers, healers and therapists all over the UK to develop their authenticity, their flexibility and their centredness so that they can mentor their clients.  For others to join my movement realises my mission in this world: which is to move away from the intellectual and superficial and into the heart of the matter.  The time is right for we, the uninvited mentors of society, to realise our deeper responsibility for human consciousness.  We have a collective mission and I’d love you to join me.  Together, with one mind even if we have many styles and approaches, we can help create the balance and peace the world is deeply in need of.  And it starts with us.

Jenny Lynn is an authority in her field of integrative psychotherapy and hypnotherapy and is since January 2012, now a Fellow of the National Council of Psychotherapists (FNCP).  Jenny is also a supervisor for the Hypnotherapy Association (MHA), member of the General Hypnotherapy Register (GHR) and individual member of the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP).  She has also been a member of the Buddhist Lay organisation the Soka Gakkai International for 30 years.

Jenny has presented online for the Hypnosummit, both in August 2009 – unlocking the mysteries of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and March 2010 – integrating counselling and psychotherapy skills into your hypnotherapy practice.  She has also presented at the European Transpersonal Assocation (Eurotas) at their 2010 Swiss summit on Buddhism and psychotherapy.

She has trained 70+ hypnotherapists in the treatment of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and is the author of The Chronic Fatigue Training Manual which is available through this site.

The Open Mind Therapist.com is designed to reach hypno-psychotherapists who want to enhance their skills and ensure they keep to their professinal body’s  CPD requirements without having to attend a physical  course.  As such the membership is available to practising hypno-psychoherapists worldwide, with existing members already from Australia and the US.  She now also hosts a growing number of groups who meet every 6 weeks for hypno-psychotherapists who are committed to getting more out of their practice, expanding their skills and insights and removing their professional isolation.

Jenny is committed to her own ongoing personal and professional development and brings her learning into her groups and practice.

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